Another oldtimer was Warren Williams who was born on March 4, 1901 and married Helen Lentzy. She was born October 7, 1907. They have no children. His father’s name was Zack Taylor Williams Sr., his mother was Sidney Elizabeth (Coleman) Williams. His grandfather on his mother’s side was Col. John Coleman, coming here from Texas in 1779. He built the house on South Gaines Street where Warren occupied it until his death. He remodeled and repainted it. The house was built in 1884. His father went back to Texas and brought Senator H.G. Putnam here with is family. Warren had five brothers and two sisters. The boys were Zack T Jr., the eldest, Lee Sidney, Preston, John Coleman and sisters were Effie and Annie Belle.

The first home of Warren Williams parents before it burned down.   It sat about where the Shady Grove Church is. Family on front porch.

The first home of Warren Williams parents before it burned down. It sat about where the Shady Grove Church is. Family on front porch.

He tells of trading 2 dozen eggs for an air rifle from the W.C. Howse General Store, then where the post office now stands on East Halifax Avenue and was the post office in the rear. He also spoke of the turpentine still he visited many times in 1911 and he used to come and kill birds for Mrs. Tom M. Adams here between Adams and Lagoon Avenue in their orchard. He used to work in the E. Day grove packing house as a young man. It was run by Herbert McGrunder.

Warren Williams Home Built and owned by his grandfather, John Coleman, in 1884.

Warren Williams Home
Built and owned by his grandfather, John Coleman, in 1884.

Mr. Williams bought the land his place of business is on from Mr. Lawrence Johnson. Mr. Johnson homesteaded it.

Mr. Johnson was Mrs. Mary Anderson’s father. All his brothers and sisters are deceased . His bother Lee’s widow was Mrs., Dorothy Williams, also deceased. They had a son, Allen Z. and a daughter Mrs. Leon (Dorothy Lee) Hutchinson.

Mr. Williams helped build the first school that stood where the school is at present.

georgefullerton

George I. Fullerton came to Oak Hill in 1916 as a representative of J.A. Hackett and Company, Broom Corn Brokers; he harvested and shipped switch grass which was used as a substitute for Broom Corn; he shipped more than three million pounds of the switch grass to manufacturers of brooms in various parts of the world during his first two years of living in Florida.

He then became temporary City Manager under the commission form of government of New Smyrna and also served as City Auditor and Clerk. He was the organizer of a new city government in New Smyrna.

He still lived in Oak Hill all that time. He was president of Fullerton Grove Corporation which he organized in 1920. In 1925, his fruit topped the New York market. He was admitted to the bar in 1916 in Oklahoma and practiced in New Smyrna; he specialized in criminal law. He belonged to lots of clubs and organizations.

On August 14, 1912, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, he married Mildred Ferguson. He moved away for a few years but moved back and was living here when he passed away.

He was born April 11, 1889 in Randall, Kansas. Mr. Fullerton’s home was on a very bad curve on the south end of Oak Hill, just before you get to the overhead pass that runs over the railroad tracks. At the curve, many people were killed. George summed up the Oak Hill picture this way – “Oak Hill has had a very colorful history, but it is peaceful and quiet now, and that’s the way we like it. Our city used to have lots of drinking and brawling, and how they used to love dancing and had lots of these.”

 

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